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Fragrant Roses

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Fragrant Roses: picture of Abraham Darby rose

While it’s quite wonderful to receive a dozen long-stemmed red roses on Valentine’s Day, what better time to daydream about and plan your very own lusciously fragrant rose garden?  You can then create your garden of long-lasting, disease-resistant roses in the colors and fragrances (fruits, flowers, spices and many others) of your choice. 

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The Spiral Aloe perplex

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  Aloe polyphylla at Semonkong Lodge central Lesotho Few plants better epitomize the quandaries of plant conservation than this iconic aloe, endemic to the heights of south-central Lesotho. Once relatively abundant (Alan Beverly estimated at least 10,000 a half century ago) This magnificent National Flower of Lesotho has become extremely rare in nature...although increasingly abundant in gardens.

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Forcing Hyacinth Bulbs in Vases

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Hyacinths are classic spring-blooming bulbs that have been popular for centuries, in large part because of their bright colors and fragrant flowers. The plant grows from large bulbs, typically planted in the garden in the fall.

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Garden Myths and Secrets

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The use of passed down pearls of wisdom and urban garden myths to improve plants and landscapes is as common as homemade cold and flu recipes. Has someone in your garden circle suggested some fool-proof miracle cure, product or technique to fix what’s ailing your plant or make it grow better? 

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Plant safari in South Africa

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Drakensberg at sunrise

As a professional photographer you dream about the day when someone calls you and asks if your passport is up to date. The answer, of course, should always be YES! As the contract photographer for Denver Botanic Gardens for nearly fifteen years, I’ve been lucky enough to get that call twice.

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Beekeeping Basics

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In winter, there isn't much a beekeeper can do to help the bees other than watch your hive entrances, keep them clear of snow, inspect the bottom board for activity in the hive and be sure the hives are protected from the wind! If you have a window in a top bar hive, you can sometimes catch a glimpse of the winter cluster (the huddle of bees in a ball). It's a good time to catch up on reading bee journals, repair and replace old equipment and render wax for candles, salves and balms. 

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