A Time for Reflection

A Time for Reflection

January 7, 2010 | Mike Kintgen
Winter is my least favorite season, no doubt about it. The coldest season does have a few perks, it is really the only time when gardeners can catch their breath and truly enjoy the garden for what it is. Every other season brings innumerable tasks, from planting to weeding, cutting back and...Learn more
Rare Opportunity.

Rare Opportunity.

December 30, 2009 | Kim Manajek
Most often, we at Denver Botanic Gardens focus on plants, but there is something else spectacular here. Since the dedication of the Boettcher Memorial Tropical Conservatory in 1966, we have also been known for our architecture. Recent additions to the DBG campus by Tryba Architects have gracefully...Learn more
Christmas Rose (Lo, How a Rose E'er blooming)

Christmas Rose (Lo, How a Rose E'er blooming)

December 23, 2009 | Mike Kintgen
Christmas rose, or Helleborus niger , was hidden at the bottom of my last blog and didn't get just attention. Christmas rose is often cited as the actual "rose" that inspired the German Christmas carol 'Es ist ein Ros entsprungen' or translated into the English Christmas song ' Lo How a Rose E'er...Learn more
Escapism!

Escapism!

December 22, 2009 | Panayoti Kelaidis
Winter Beauty  in the Rock Alpine Garden

Winter Beauty in the Rock Alpine Garden

December 21, 2009 | Mike Kintgen
Despite the balmy 54 degrees Fahrenheit it is as I write this, today is the official start of winter. The winter solstice not only marks the official start of winter but ironically the return to longer and eventually warmer days. Winter has already made several visits to Denver long before the...Learn more
Berry Holiday!

Berry Holiday!

December 21, 2009 | Panayoti Kelaidis
Okay, the berries aren't bright red, but they are certainly festive and are worthy to deck my halls! I am always mystified that anything as gorgeous as European Mountain ash ( Sorbus aucuparia ) is really not that frequently planted. Our native mountain ash is essentially non-existent in gardens...Learn more
Don’t Miss It! Week of December 19th

Don’t Miss It! Week of December 19th

December 18, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
• The Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa) is a colorful native of southern Asia and Polynesia, and has been put to many uses by indigenous people. Its sweet, starchy roots are used as food and fermented into alcohol, and its leaves are used to thatch houses as well as to make hula skirts. Thought to...Learn more
Catch up time!

Catch up time!

December 16, 2009 | Panayoti Kelaidis
The idea of living in a tropical or subtropical region is appealing enough when the thermometer plunges and you have a hard time starting the car...but when would you ever have time to sort through your pictures, file away those stacks of papers or savor the summer just passed? This is when I...Learn more
Don’t Miss It! Week of December 12th

Don’t Miss It! Week of December 12th

December 12, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
• Hands Off: While you’re palm hunting, check out these scary ones. Verschaffeltia splendida (Stilt Palm) sports really serious looking spines along the stem, and sits up on stilt-like roots. And Zombia antillarum (Zombie Palm), a native of the Antilles, features a woven pattern of equally prickly...Learn more
Hardy in Denver?

Hardy in Denver?

December 9, 2009 | Panayoti Kelaidis
Ahem...but will it come back next year? Good question. The hundreds of South African plants that fill our gardens, not to mention all sorts of tender Mediterraneans and California shrubs that we have been playing with at Denver Botanic Gardens and beyond...how will they weather an interminable,...Learn more

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