Don't Miss It! Week of January 23rd

Don't Miss It! Week of January 23rd

January 22, 2010 | Ellen Hertzman
• On your way to the Lollipop Plant, stop to admire Phaius tankervilliae, a stunning member of the orchid family also known as a Nun’s Cap Orchid or Swamp Lily. This winter-blooming native of the Asian tropics will retain its flowers for a long time. You will see it on your right as you head up the...Learn more
Don't Miss It! Week of January 16th

Don't Miss It! Week of January 16th

January 15, 2010 | Ellen Hertzman
• You can just feel the excitement (well, I can!) in the Lilac Garden, where fat buds cover the bare twigs of the Lilacs (mostly Syringa var). These flower buds have been developing since shortly after last year’s lilac bloom was finished (which is why you want to prune your lilac immediately after...Learn more
Don't Miss It! Week of January 9th

Don't Miss It! Week of January 9th

January 8, 2010 | Ellen Hertzman
• Easily one of the most interesting winter-time trees in our garden is the Corkscrew Hazel (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’). Also known as Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick (after an old-time Scottish comedian whose trademark was his walking stick,) its branches twist and turn. Like other hazelnut trees,...Learn more
Christmas Rose (Lo, How a Rose E'er blooming)

Christmas Rose (Lo, How a Rose E'er blooming)

December 23, 2009 | Mike Kintgen
Christmas rose, or Helleborus niger , was hidden at the bottom of my last blog and didn't get just attention. Christmas rose is often cited as the actual "rose" that inspired the German Christmas carol 'Es ist ein Ros entsprungen' or translated into the English Christmas song ' Lo How a Rose E'er...Learn more
Winter Beauty  in the Rock Alpine Garden

Winter Beauty in the Rock Alpine Garden

December 21, 2009 | Mike Kintgen
Despite the balmy 54 degrees Fahrenheit it is as I write this, today is the official start of winter. The winter solstice not only marks the official start of winter but ironically the return to longer and eventually warmer days. Winter has already made several visits to Denver long before the...Learn more
Don’t Miss It! Week of December 19th

Don’t Miss It! Week of December 19th

December 18, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
• The Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa) is a colorful native of southern Asia and Polynesia, and has been put to many uses by indigenous people. Its sweet, starchy roots are used as food and fermented into alcohol, and its leaves are used to thatch houses as well as to make hula skirts. Thought to...Learn more
Don't Miss It! Week of December 5th

Don't Miss It! Week of December 5th

December 5, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
• And Purple…: A trio of purples cascade from the top of the elevator tree. Three vines covered in blossoms intertwine: Morning Glory (Ipomoea indica) is a familiar warm-season introduction here, but is native to the tropical areas of the New World. Another familiar introduction is a form of...Learn more
Is it spring yet?.....

Is it spring yet?.....

December 3, 2009 | Panayoti Kelaidis
I realize that here in Ski country it's not always popular to complain when the thermometer plummets and your back is saying "enough white stuff already!"...we inveterate gardeners frankly can't wait for spring. How accommodating it is to have crocuses! I took this picture in the Rock Alpine Garden...Learn more
Don't Miss It! Week of November 21st

Don't Miss It! Week of November 21st

November 20, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
comes from the Greek: “encephalartos” literally means “bread in the head,” and lets you know that a starchy, bready food can be gathered from inside the round trunk. And of course “horridus” refers to its ferocious looking fronds. A Southern African native, this indoor plant loves dry heat and...Learn more
Don't Miss It! Week of November 14th

Don't Miss It! Week of November 14th

November 13, 2009 | Ellen Hertzman
Even as the season changes, there are still plenty of plants worth seeking out in the Gardens. Here are a few examples: • …And More Berries: You have to go see this one: Euonymus europaeus (from the Greek “good” + “name” + “european”—not that helpful in this case!) has the wildest color scheme I’ve...Learn more

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