Researchers surveying a transect along the High Line Canal

Ecology Along the High Line Canal

September 12, 2018 | Research & Conservation
This summer we began a new research project surveying the High Line Canal to understand the botanical and ecological resources along this corridor through the Denver Metro Area. The High Line Canal spans 71 miles across Colorado from Waterton Canyon in Littleton to Green Valley Ranch east of Denver...Learn more
Sphaeralcea coccinea (scarlet globemallow), Malvaceae (mallow family)

Favorite Botanical Finds Along the High Line Canal

September 5, 2018 | Research & Conservation
The verdict is in: Here are our research team’s favorite botanical finds along the High Line Canal! If you’ve ever spent time on the High Line Canal Trail, you may be familiar with some of the common trees and shrubs. Maybe you’ve walked beneath the snowy arms of the cottonwood trees ( Populus sp...Learn more
Conservation data collection

Denver Botanic Gardens awarded Conservation Practitioner Accreditation

August 29, 2018 | Jennifer Ramp Neale, Ph.D.
Denver Botanic Gardens has long been a leader in biodiversity conservation. Our efforts have been recognized by Botanic Gardens Conservation International through the awarding of the newly launched Conservation Practitioner Accreditation. The accreditation program recognizes conservation-minded...Learn more
Purple stigmas on female buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides

Unholster That Hori Hori: Collecting Plants Along the High Line Canal Trail

July 22, 2018 | Research & Conservation
This summer, Denver Botanic Gardens, with funding from the High Line Canal Conservancy, is conducting a survey of the plants growing along the High Line Canal. Drawing water from the South Platte River, the Canal winds 71 miles from Waterton Canyon in Littleton to the eastern edge of Green Valley...Learn more
Sclerocactus glaucus cactus

Tracking Cactus Populations

May 16, 2018 | Research & Conservation
Sneaky Spines and Careful Measurements Sweeping western slope views, slightly menacing rain clouds and beautiful, tough plants surrounded us. I listened for my field partner to shout out cactus dimensions and wrote each number into its proper cell on the data sheet while picking prickly pear spines...Learn more
Just Water’s boxed water

Thinking inside the box...of water!

May 14, 2018 | Jennifer Riley-Chetwynd
When it comes to the Gardens’ commitment to water stewardship , thinking 'Inside the Box' can make a difference. Today we will stop selling bottled water at our two restaurants – the Hive and Offshoots. Instead, visitors will be able to purchase Just Water ’s boxed water. This move accomplishes two...Learn more
Source units being installed Denver Botanic Gardens York Street

Solar-powered Atmospheric Water Harvesters are Here

April 12, 2018 | Jennifer Riley-Chetwynd
Denver Botanic Gardens recently installed four solar-powered atmospheric water harvesters – three at York Street and one at Chatfield Farms. Using the power of the sun, these SOURCE units accelerate the condensation process to convert water vapor into water. All but one of the harvesters, which are...Learn more
Monitoring Sclerocactus glaucus

Winter Planning for Summer Research Projects

February 28, 2018 | Research & Conservation
Many of the beautiful places where we study plants and mushrooms are dormant and snow-covered this time of year, but the Research & Conservation department is still humming with activity! In the winter, our staff and volunteers identify herbarium specimens collected the previous year, analyze...Learn more
Blossoms of Light

AmazonSmile

December 5, 2017 | Development Department
Did you know that you can support Denver Botanic Gardens by shopping at AmazonSmile? AmazonSmile is a simple and automatic way for you to support Denver Botanic Gardens every time you shop, at no cost to you. When you shop at smile.amazon.com , you’ll find the exact same low prices and selection as...Learn more
Inflorescences of Pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica), a species that typically occurs further north.

Where do we start to conserve biodiversity?

November 29, 2017 | Christina Alba
The world is changing. Merriam-Webster defines the word baseline as a starting point. This is a very simple yet hopeful concept in a world that is changing so quickly. It suggests a chance to plant our feet, catch our breath, and start the work of conserving biodiversity so that future generations...Learn more

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