what's blooming in august

  • Botanical Name:

    Rudbeckia 'Denver Daisy'

    Common Name:

    Denver Daisy™ Rudbeckia

    Family:

    Asteraceae

    Native Region:

    Cultivated Origin

    Description:

    The Denver Daisy is a hybrid from one of our Colorado native plants, Rudbeckia hirta. Celebrated as the flower of the City of Denver, this plant was introduced to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the founding of Denver. Grown as an annual, this plant grows to height of up to 2 feet producing striking bright yellow flowers with dark coloration radiating about a third to half way down the petals from the center. Peak flowering is in July/August.

    Garden Location:

    O’Fallon Perennial Walk, Crossroads, All-America Selections Garden
  • Botanical Name:

    Nymphea Hybrids

    Common Name:

    Waterlily

    Family:

    Nymphaeaceae

    Native Region:

    World-wide distribution

    Description:

    Waterlilies are a diverse group of aquatic plants distributed over most of the world. The waterlily collections at Denver Botanic Gardens feature both hardy and tropical groups. Some of the waterlily selections that have evolved through our waterlily trials include:

    • Nymphea ‘Denver’ (Hardy)
    • Nymphea ‘Denver’s Delight’ (Hardy)
    • Nymphea ‘Colorado’ (Hardy)
    • Nymphea ‘Joey Tomocik’ (Hardy)
    • Nymphea ‘Stan Skinger’ (Tropical)
    • Nymphea ‘William McLane’ (Tropical)

    New to our collections is the Nymphea 'Pink Ribbon' developed by the Water Gardeners International. This new waterlily is part of an international project to raise money for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation for fighting breast cancer.

    Garden Location:

    Distributed all over the Gardens in the pools
  • Botanical Name:

    Echinacea spp.

    Common Name:

    Purple Coneflower

    Family:

    Asteraceae

    Native Region:

    North America

    Description:

    Purple Coneflower is a great choice for a low maintenance garden. The plant has been used by many Native American tribes to cure a multitude of ailments, and Echinacea supplements are still used today to boost the immune system. This flower is both drought tolerant and virtually disease free. Use this flower in borders, natural areas, and in flowers beds. Blooms attract a variety of birds and insects, and goldfinches especially like the seed. Flower blooms are most commonly purple (E. purpurea), but may also be white (E. pallida) or pink.

    Garden Location:

    Lilac Garden, South end of Romantic Garden, Shady Lane
  • Botanical Name:

    Hibiscus moscheutos

    Common Name:

    Hardy Hibiscus

    Family:

    Malvaceae

    Native Region:

    North America

    Description:

    Hardy hibiscus, Hibiscus moscheutos, is a deciduous shrub that grows from 4 to 7 feet in height. Related to hollyhocks and prairie winecups, the hardy hibiscus is native to the U.S. In the wild it is found along creeksides in the southeastern states. Late summer and early fall are peak bloom times for the plant. The flowers of the hardy hibiscus can be up to 8 inches across – salad plate size. Typically in shades of red, pink or white or in a combination of these colors, the flowers bring a tropical feel to any landscape. Unfortunately, the dramatic blossoms only last a day.

    Garden Location:

    Perennial Walk, Lilac Garden
  • Botanical Name:

    Tabebuia heterophylla

    Common Name:

    Whitewood

    Family:

    Bignoniaceae

    Native Region:

    Puerto Rico and Cuba

    Description:

    Tabebuia heterophylla is a medium size, semi deciduous tree. In areas where it experiences a distinct dry season, there is an explosion of pink flowers in mid winter. In landscapes where it receives year round moisture (including in our conservatory) the bloom season is extended over a longer period with fewer flowers appearing at any one time. Tabebuia is gaining popularity as a source of wood for furniture and flooring.

    Garden Location:

    Boettcher Memorial Tropical Conservatory