Spring blooms here, there and everywhere
Nepenthes spp . . . Tropical Pitcher Plants
A surprising 65 degrees today, in January!
It was a record-breaking 71 degrees and sunny yesterday, too. Just enough warm weather lately to coax out some early bloomers. The hellebores (Helleborus spp.) and witch hazel (Hamamelis species) are already starting to bloom in the garden just south and southeast of the Waring House at 909 York Street. And the hellebores are just covered with bees! Truly an early sign of spring . . .
Winter Wonderland
   John Temple’s column in the Rocky Mountain News today, ‘Simple moments, rich rewards’ was very inspiring. Not just because I work at Denver Botanic Gardens, but also because the article hits it in the nail regarding the little things in life that really matter. Every morning I look out my kitchen window and the sight of geese in the golf course behind my house or the Daphne that still refuses...
Wonder
Meanwhile, the gracefulness particular to this season takes shape through a delicate choreography, and nature continues her cyclical, imperfect journey. Recently, I saw a dragonfly clinging to leaves and branches near the Gates Montane Garden, its tattered, iridescent wings prismatic in the sunlight.  Elsewhere in the Gardens, the coralberries, pink as Jordan almonds, and the hot tamale-red pomes on the crabapples, remind me of the beads of an African necklace. ...
Nymphaea capensis in bloom in research greenhouse
Nymphaea 'St. Louis Gold'
The brilliant yellow tropical waterlily Nymphaea ‘St. Louis Gold’ is lighting up the propagation greenhouse at Denver Botanic Gardens. Possibly the brightest yellow waterlily of all, ‘St. Louis Gold’ was hybridized by the legendary Dr. George H. Pring. With ample light and water temperatures above 70 degrees, tropical waterlilies can flower even during the winter months, adding fragrance and excitement to your home or greenhouse.
All good things must end...
  
A Love Letter to the Montréal Botanical Garden
Only two days left to enjoy my time at the Montréal Botanical Garden. So, I decide to walk in the Courtyard of the Senses where the signs that identify the plants are written in French, English, Latin and Braille. On the MBG website there is a quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, the man who wrote the French classic, The Little Prince: "L’essentiel est invisible pour les yeux." (The essential is...
Wonders of Africa
The symbol of Kirstenbosh, the National Botanical Garden in Capetown, is the Bird of Paradise. An amazing "albino" (which is missing the red pigment and has the still has the yellow pigment) was released a few years ago as Strelitzia reginae 'Mandela's Gold.' We were thrilled to see this in several places around Kirstenbosch and also in private gardens. But South Africa is not just for plant nerds. On the...

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