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Don't Miss It! Week of November 21st

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Don't Miss It! Week of November 21st

comes from the Greek: “encephalartos” literally means “bread in the head,” and lets you know that a starchy, bready food can be gathered from inside the round trunk. And of course “horridus” refers to its ferocious looking fronds. A Southern African native, this indoor plant loves dry heat and requires very little water. • Up on the Roof: If you haven’t been up to the Green Roof lately, I recommend bringing...

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Don't Miss It! Week of November 14th

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Don't Miss It! Week of November 14th

Even as the season changes, there are still plenty of plants worth seeking out in the Gardens. Here are a few examples: • …And More Berries: You have to go see this one: Euonymus europaeus (from the Greek “good” + “name” + “european”—not that helpful in this case!) has the wildest color scheme I’ve seen. The center of each berry is bright orange and the surrounding wings are an astonishing hot pink—very...

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Autumn blooms

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Autumn blooms

Autumn is never my favorite season but it is perhaps the season that I find myself savoring moments and days the most. Soon a bitter north wind will be blowing and the 2009 gardening season will be but a memory and photos. In the mean time there is much to admire on these balmy late autumn days. Panayoti Kelaidis wrote about a nice array of fall blooming crocus last month and...

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Don't Miss It! Week of November 7th

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Don't Miss It! Week of November 7th

This time of year, a little inside and a little outside is where I want to be; it all depends on the weather. Luckily, either way I have something to see and something to learn. • Is This Tree Dead? No, actually, it is a Larix sibirica or Siberian Larch, which is a deciduous pine tree—that is, it loses its needles (more correctly called leaves) in the fall and sprouts new...

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 31st

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 31st

• Sometimes, when I go into the Boettcher Memorial Conservatory, I am looking for Big Leaves. Big Leaves really make me feel as though I am somewhere tropical. You can’t get a whole lot bigger than Anthurium hookeri ‘Big Bird’, a really big member of the Arum family (think of the Peace Lily.) • As you wander the Boettcher Memorial Conservatory, you’ll see several examples of Staghorn Fern (Platycerium), a well-named...

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 24th

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 24th

• Don’t forget to look down; you’ll notice a lot of low-growing color. Perennial Walk offers a particularly good example of Polygonum, and you can find plenty of low-growing Sumac (Rhus aromatica) spread beneath the trees in the Ponderosa Border.

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 17th

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Don't Miss It! Week of October 17th

• But to enjoy the season at its best, now is the time to step back from individual plants and admire sweeps of color and texture. Enjoy the reds and golds, browns and greens. Plenty of beautiful leaves remain: Korean Spice Viburnum (Viburnum carlesii) and Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) in the Birds and Bees Garden,   • Favorite lunch spot this week: The Knot Garden is looking fairly untouched by the hard frost. Pick a bench...

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Forest on Fire!!!

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Forest on Fire!!!

Here is a picture of Judy Sellers in one of her typical wild habitats! In addition to being a long time volunteer and supporter of DBG, Judy is a landscape designer and active environmental steward, prominent in the Nature Conservancy and Garden Club of America, among many other organizations. She has written the text for Colorado Wild, a stunning tribute to nature in Colorado.

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Conkers anyone?

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Conkers anyone?

Every time someone asks me "what are the shiny brown things?" that they got from the  ground underneath the Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra), I wonder what they did as kids in the fall.  I grew up in England where we had horse chestnuts (Aesculus hippocastanum), very similar trees but bigger and with spiny fruit casings instead of the smoother ones in the picture. The fruit inside look the same though. We...

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