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Featured Garden of the Week: Western Panoramas

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Featured Garden of the Week: Western Panoramas

As you enter the Gardens, creating a sense of place are the three landscapes bordering the three sides of the Amphitheatre. Exhibiting dominant tree species of Colorado’s three major life zones; the plains, foothills and subalpine are the Cottonwood, Ponderosa and Bristlecone Borders respectively, collectively known as Western Panoramas.  Planted along with the trees are the dominant forbs (herbaceous flowering plants) and grasses commonly found in these life zones. These...

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Featured Garden of the Week: Sho-Fu-En (Japanese Garden) – Celebrating 30 years

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Featured Garden of the Week: Sho-Fu-En (Japanese Garden) – Celebrating 30 years

Denver Botanic Gardens’ Japanese Garden is an authentic traditional Japanese garden reflecting the unique environment of its Colorado setting. The garden is named Sho-Fu-En, meaning “garden of the pines and wind,” both of which are typical of the natural environment of Colorado. The main feature of this garden is the abundant use of beautifully aged character pines, Pinus ponderosa, collected and donated by members of the Rocky Mountain Bonsai Club....

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Featured Garden of the Week: Roads Water-Smart Garden

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Featured Garden of the Week: Roads Water-Smart Garden

Standing as testimony that gardening in Colorado does not have to be dull and boring is the Roads Water-Smart Garden, which is currently bursting in color. Bursts of yellow, purple, pink, orange and white are dotted throughout this garden. Meticulously cared for by our Curator of Native Plants, Dan Johnson, this garden is a showcase of what a garden could look like in Colorado with the selection of the right...

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Featured Garden of the Week: Lilac Garden

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Featured Garden of the Week: Lilac Garden

Denver Botanic Gardens is home to over 300 taxa (which includes hybrids and cultivars) of about 69 species of Iris. This diversity is distributed throughout the Gardens, though a majority is displayed in the Lilac Garden. Situated almost in the middle of our grounds, the irises in this garden are currently at their peak flowering stage. A few lilacs that did not get zapped by our late spring frost are...

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Blooming on a Sunny Afternoon

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Blooming on a Sunny Afternoon

Early mornings in the gardens are definitely  peaceful and cool, however some gardens, like some people, are not at their best until well after lunchtime. The south end of Dryland Mesa is currently one of these gardens and the cacti flowers, which are at their peak right now, are definitely late risers, refusing to open until the sun is at its fullest. Admittedly an early morning visit does have the reward...

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Green Roof – a year-and-a-half later

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Green Roof – a year-and-a-half later

The green roof at Denver Botanic Gardens opened in November 2007. Within a year and a half, this garden has established very well creating a green space where once was a regular cemented roof. Situated above our former gift shop (soon to become a bistro), this one-of-a-kind green roof features native and drought tolerant plants that thrive well in our semi-arid climate with limited water. The green roof was initially established...

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Living within Nature's Landscape Cont'd.

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Living within Nature's Landscape Cont'd.

When I wrote that I was unsure how to live within a Western landscape in drought, it it immediately seemed that Nature took offence and sent snow and precipitation directly at us.  We're still in a drought, but the winter storm that forced us to reschedule Susan Tweit and Jim Steinberg certainly illustrated another way to live within the landscape. 

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Living in Nature's Landscape

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[gallery] I've been watching the quiet declaration of drought conditions with an eye more curious than fearful.  The US drought monitor classifies the current conditions as moderate drought, or D1, which is pretty low on the scale. The gardeners around me, however, range from "not on my weather radar" indifference to head-shaking, ground-staring, "I knew this day would come" pessimism.  It would make a fascinating study of human personality, I think,...

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