Congratulations to our 2009 horticulture interns!
Finishing up their internship last week, our 2009 interns were some of the best. Students presented their projects and they were recognized for their hard work during a luncheon. Our best wishes to these students as they complete their studies and enter the professional world of horticulture, be it commercial, academic or public horticulture. Also, special thanks to our internship program coordinator, Horticulturist Ann Montague, who has spent countless hours coordinating...
Spice up your August with OREGANOS!
My xeriscape at home is a tragedy right now: masses of giant larkspur, horned poppies, mullein--all twice as big as they should be--all flopping and smothering any little gems below. Depressing. But in my back yard my rock work is garlanded and festooned, embellished and just plain SAVED by that herb of grace, Oregano. I'm not talking about culinary oregano (Origanum vulgare var. hirtum), which I have down by my...
Shop at the Gardens Now Open at DBG!
 
Featured Garden of the Week: Aquatic Gardens
The water gardens at Denver Botanic Gardens, despite their slow start this spring on account of hail and cooler weather could not be more spectacular than it is right now. Artistically choreographed by Joe Tomocik, Curator of Aquatic Collections, our aquatic displays are one of the best in the country. Assisting Joe every year with installation and dismantling of the displays are volunteers from the Colorado Water Garden Society. In the...
Altai by camel caravan
Primula nivalis on summit of pass in Mongolia
Featured Garden of the Week: Western Panoramas
As you enter the Gardens, creating a sense of place are the three landscapes bordering the three sides of the Amphitheatre. Exhibiting dominant tree species of Colorado’s three major life zones; the plains, foothills and subalpine are the Cottonwood, Ponderosa and Bristlecone Borders respectively, collectively known as Western Panoramas.  Planted along with the trees are the dominant forbs (herbaceous flowering plants) and grasses commonly found in these life zones. These...
Featured Garden of the Week: Sho-Fu-En (Japanese Garden) – Celebrating 30 years
Denver Botanic Gardens’ Japanese Garden is an authentic traditional Japanese garden reflecting the unique environment of its Colorado setting. The garden is named Sho-Fu-En, meaning “garden of the pines and wind,” both of which are typical of the natural environment of Colorado. The main feature of this garden is the abundant use of beautifully aged character pines, Pinus ponderosa, collected and donated by members of the Rocky Mountain Bonsai Club....
Featured Garden of the Week: Roads Water-Smart Garden
Standing as testimony that gardening in Colorado does not have to be dull and boring is the Roads Water-Smart Garden, which is currently bursting in color. Bursts of yellow, purple, pink, orange and white are dotted throughout this garden. Meticulously cared for by our Curator of Native Plants, Dan Johnson, this garden is a showcase of what a garden could look like in Colorado with the selection of the right...
Featured Garden of the Week: Lilac Garden
Denver Botanic Gardens is home to over 300 taxa (which includes hybrids and cultivars) of about 69 species of Iris. This diversity is distributed throughout the Gardens, though a majority is displayed in the Lilac Garden. Situated almost in the middle of our grounds, the irises in this garden are currently at their peak flowering stage. A few lilacs that did not get zapped by our late spring frost are...
Blooming on a Sunny Afternoon
Early mornings in the gardens are definitely  peaceful and cool, however some gardens, like some people, are not at their best until well after lunchtime. The south end of Dryland Mesa is currently one of these gardens and the cacti flowers, which are at their peak right now, are definitely late risers, refusing to open until the sun is at its fullest. Admittedly an early morning visit does have the reward...

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