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David Salman visits Denver Botanic Gardens to celebrate Rocky Mountain Gardens

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David Salman visits Denver Botanic Gardens to celebrate Rocky Mountain Gardens

David Salman has plenty to keep him busy.  There are plants to tend, businesses to run, articles and blogs to write (and if you read his blog, there's a rescued puppy named Jarrah who's always ready to play), and certainly an appreciative audience anywhere there are gardeners in the west.  We are so fortunate to have him join us in Denver for "Inspired by Mountains and Plains: Redefining the Well-Adapted Regional Garden" Friday, May 21 at 7:00 p.m.

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Gardening Season Arrives for Rocky Mountain Gardeners!

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Gardening Season Arrives for Rocky Mountain Gardeners!

I can tell gardening season is here, not just by the brilliant sunshine, the gardeners eager to get started, the students jumping into classes that they'll use next week, the plant sale and the shoppers, or the colleague rashly vowing to start his peppers outdoors this weekend in spite of frost warnings at his altitude.  Rocky Mountain Gardening has some element of risk and unpredictability after all (last nights low...

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Lights, Camera, Blossom at Spring Plant Sale

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Strut your stuff and come to the red carpet event that opens this year's gardening season: Denver Botanic Gardens' Spring Plant Sale. All you wonderful VIP’s will enter through the new fabulous group entrance and be greeted by one of our 500 dedicated volunteers. Don’t forget to strike a pose in our gift shop and stock up on all your gardening needs. Then, sashay on up to all 12 plant divisions that...

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Of Course! Corydalis

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Of Course! Corydalis

       Everybody knows bleeding hearts (Dicentra) but their cousins, Corydalis, are rarely found in Colorado Gardens. Denver Botanic Gardens is helping change all that. The largely drought tolerant genus Corydalis contains hundreds of species (compared with just a dozen or so of the moisture loving Dicentra) and many of these are in peak form at the Gardens right now. The first picture shows  'George Baker', probably the most eye blasting...

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The Golden Mountains... to the East!

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Colorado's own mining towns have stories of boom and bust, gold rushes, fortunes made and lost. But tomorrow night I'm looking East, not West.  Mike Bone is preparing to tell the stories of his travel to the Golden Mountains of Central Asia as a plant explorer.  And it will be a fascinating travelogue of places most of us will not see, but also, a glimpse into a tradition overlooked by...

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What's happening in the Rock Alpine Garden this week? A few new treasures are in bloom

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What's happening in the Rock Alpine Garden this week? A few new treasures are in bloom

Saturday's warm weather drew out more bulbs and other early bloomers, and finally its beginning to look like March should.  March belongs to several genera in the rock garden, Crocus, Galanthus and Helleborus are just a few genera that shine in March.  I hope to do a blog on both Galanthus and Helleborus in due time. First we will revisit the genus Crocus, the main focus of last week's blog.  The...

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The new Darlene Radichel Plant Select Garden

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The new Darlene Radichel Plant Select Garden

I have always considered myself very fortunate to be part of the Gardens' horticulture team, but right now, as part of the team creating the new Darlene Radichel Plant Select Garden, I feel it even more so. This new garden, located on the former site of the Monet Garden, will showcase the many plants selected and promoted by the Plant Select program since its inception 10-15 years ago. These are plants...

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Gardening with Natives

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Gardening with Natives

Cleome serrulata – Rocky Mountain bee plant – Easily grown from seed, as the name suggests these purple annuals are a favorite with bees. They range in height from 2 feet to over 6 feet depending on seed & conditions. Ipomopsis aggregata – Scarlet gilia – this biennial is a favorite with hummingbirds. Also good at higher elevations. The first year they form pretty...

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