Recondite plant #3 Scheer's ball cactus
Why Baby Vegetables are a Luxury, and Other Thoughts on Preparing for Winter
Preparing for winter? Yes, I've been thinking about winter for a couple months now, ever since I decided to try to eat more local foods. I won't be limiting myself to eating only foods grown in Colorado, especially over the winter, but I am wanting to pay more attention to where my food comes from. And, I have extra incentive, since local foods tend to be cheaper these days than foods relying on expensive long-distance transportation!
Recondite Plants: what are they? where are they? #1
Season of Inspiration
This is the season of inspiration.  I know everyone talks about gardening in the spring, but this is the time of year that motivates me.  Every garden has come into its own.  Yards, parks, estates, landscapes: by now you know what they are going to be.  Thick slabs of watermelon, backlogs of zuchini, fulsome fruit and fields of flowers: even the weeds seem mastered by an all-encompassing abundance.  The failures (we've...
Record Agave Blooms
  Though a common occurrence in parts of the southwest, century plants  (Agave sp.),  blooming in Denver are rare. Most years there is one blooming somewhere in Denver and we all take trips to visit it and marvel at the huge flower spike. This year we are lucky enough to have three blooming here at the Gardens. Ok, so only one is the insanely tall (about 18 feet) flower spike of Agave...
Strange things end up on my desk...
I guess it's not a plant that is easy to love, but I can't help but admire something that has adapted so incredibly over time to the point of losing a fundamental facet of its "plantiness": it's not even green!
Aloe Envy
  I have aloe envy. I recently saw the diversity of plants that thrive in the Souther California climate.  The aloes they have there are incredible.  More than any other plant (and there are lot of plants), I wish I could walk among the aloes on a regular basis.  Just look at them! The large one pictured is Aloe candelabrum: Can you imagine that on your window sill?  It's magnificent.  It reminds me of Dr....
Amazing Transformation
Early this spring around mid-March, the native Plains Garden at Denver Botanic Gardens underwent a simulated version of a vital ecological process of the shortgrass prairie -- FIRE. Fire is important in maintaining the structure and diversity of the shortgrass prairie ecosystem. Since human settlement, fire suppression has lead to the alteration of vegetation composition of the shortgrass prairie and the resulting biotic interactions. The prescribed burn at the Gardens performed...
I got back to my desk after a lunch meeting today, and there was a message from a co-worker saying I must go look at the northern portion of the Cottonwood Border because it looked “absolutely stunning.” How could I possibly sit down to work at my computer after a statement like that. So off I went to check it out. The Cottonwood Border (part of Western...
Unusual Edible Ornamental

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