Plant Instant Gratification from the Plant Preview Sale
The following was written by Nina Sisk, a member of this year's Plant Preview Party committee. Perhaps nothing is as satisfying in gardening as planting containers and window boxes in the spring. Just select an interesting mix of plants stick them in the designated pot or window box and step back to admire your handiwork. Voila!  The hardest part of the task just might be selecting the right plants.  The Plant...
Which Hazel?  Woody Plants for an Early Spring
It’s early March, and though we’ll probably (hopefully) get another snowstorm or two before the growing season proper, the momentum of springtime is undeniable.  Early bulbs like crocus, snowdrops, and adonis are flowering, and leaves of their later counterparts are peeking through the soil. Flowering bulbs are a hallmark of spring, but some shrubs and trees are equal heralds of the season.  One of the earliest to flower is the witch...
How do I get started xeriscaping my yard? Is it too early to start aerating my lawn? When should I start my vegetables from seed? Are there any good murder-mystery novels that involve my interest in horticulture? If you’ve asked yourself any or all of those questions, and you are a member of Denver Botanic Gardens, fear not. The area’s best resource on these topics and so much more, the Helen...
Membership: Rewarding on So Many Levels
When you decide to become a member of Denver Botanic Gardens, you might be thinking about the many visits you will enjoy with friends and family: enjoying the Orchid Showcase and the Boettcher Memorial Tropical Conservatory on a cold blustery day in the winter, the warm evening strolls in the summer, getting delightfully lost in the autumn Corn Maze at Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield, the year-round discounts at The Shop at...
Pumpkins!
You see a lot of pumpkins at this time of year, in food, drinks, and decorations.  But if all you know is the orange, round, Jack-o’-Lantern pumpkin, you may be woefully underestimating this group of plants.   Pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo, mostly) are part of an exclusively New World genus that includes some of the oldest cultivated crops in the Americas.  Native peoples from Maine to Argentina have grown them for centuries,...
A Glowing Review for Fungus!
Fungi sometimes get a bad rap.  They are suspicious, insidious, and villainous—growing unseen and erupting without warning from just about anything.  Not everyone is down on fungus though (Wales celebrated National Fungus Day on October 14), and for good reason.  Fungi are important decomposers of plant matter (without them we’d all be neck-deep or worse in leaves and old wood) and are essential partners for plants for nutrient and water...
[gallery link="file" columns="2" orderby="title"] Gardeners sometimes anticipate the changing of the seasons with glee; new weather means new tasks, a change of pace.  But fall and its frosts are a little different.  When a gardener is an artist, and the cultivation of plants is his or her performance, a cold snap could mean a cancelled performance season or even the death of your star attractions.  If you've been following the weather, you'll...
As imperceptibly as Grief the Summer lapsed away
As imperceptibly as Grief The Summer lapsed away -- Too imperceptible at last To seem like Perfidy -- A Quietness distilled As Twilight long begun, Or Nature spending with herself Sequestered Afternoon -- The Dusk drew earlier in -- The Morning foreign shone -- A courteous, yet harrowing Grace, As Guest, that would be gone -- And thus, without a Wing Or service of a Keel Our Summer made her light escape Into the Beautiful. -Emily Dickinson The killing frost of 2012 approaches—many plants will perish this...
It's SPRINGTIME!! Yippeeeee!
Bulbs are one of the last great bargains: you pay fifty cents for a bulb and it blooms beautifully the next spring. In two years time it is twice as big, and some will even self sow and multiply. Talk about investment! Bulbs beat Wall Street hands down! Where else can you produce carpets of color that cheer the heart in springtime (when you need it after a long winter)...
The Aster Yellows Blues
August and September bring the heyday of many plants of the aster family (Asteraceae). Asters, chrysanthemums, black- and brown-eyed susans, sunflowers, and others grace the landscape with late summer color. Along with them, though, comes a pernicious illness with a mysterious cause:  Aster Yellows. Plants infected with aster yellows can show a variety of symptoms, from yellowing and reddening of foliage (hence the name), greening of flowers, dwarfing, extremely bushy appearance,...

Pages