February 18, 2009 | Joe Tomocik, Former Aquatic Collection Curator

Eighty-years young Denver Botanic Gardens’ super volunteer Larry Knowles and Nepenthes alata at our Information Desk.

There are seventy species of tropical pitcher plants, first described in Madagascar in the 17th century. Insects and animal life are captured and digested when falling into sweet smelling nectar at the base of the modified leaf extensions…pitchers. Fantasy-stories speak of man-eating pitcher plants. Rodent capturing leaves are more realistic. The tropical pitcher plants are heavily vining, and do great in hanging baskets! They are dioecious, each plant bearing male or female flowers; thus, two plants are needed to produce seed. New plants can also be grown by cuttings. See pitcher plants right now at our Information Desk.

Category: 
Tags: 

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.