Adonis, Japanese Pheasant eye
Here Fukujukai is only in bud a few weeks ago, but the bronze foliage is so sculptural and the buds so alluring that it still makes a bold statement. Adonis annua: the annual Adonis. Yes, Virginia. There are scarlet Adonis. This one is naturalized in one spot at Denver Botanic Gardens: alas! It is annual! But loves to grow in Colorado. If you want to establish this, sow fresh seed...
Galanthus elwesii is blooming
Check It Out! Galanthus elwesii is blooming, a sure sign that Spring is just around the corner. As you are strolling through Denver Botanic Gardens, keep an eye out for these beautiful, delicate looking little nodding white flowers, poking their heads up through the snow. Perhaps this is where they get their common name, 'Snowdrops.' Their botanical name, Galanthus, comes from the Greek words gala for milk, and anthos for...
[gallery link="file" orderby="title"] Rain may not brighten your day, but I was positively enthusiastic about it this week.  After enough winter, it seemed like a sign of spring and a chance to step into the Gardens.  My shoes clomped across wet pavement and I relished the sensation.  When I hit a patch of ice, I nearly went down: even looking directly at it I couldn't see it.  If it hadn't been for...
Peru Discovery - Chapter 2
Our second day of discovery began with a flight to Cusco, the historical capital of the Inca Empire.   We had time to rest and adjust to the high altitude (over 11,000 feet) before meeting our guide Carlos Seminario (a Cusco native) and beginning a tour of the city.  With the aid of some well-done exhibit interpretation, it is easy to pick out the shapes of the many animal figures that have come...
(World) Water Day is March 22
“World Water Day” conjures up images of far-away problems (e.g. a billion people around the world do not have access to clean and safe water – with more than a third of these people living in Sub-Saharan Africa). If such alarming stats summed up World Water Day, however, the most anyone living in Denver could do would be to send money to an international water charity. Water issues, really, are not...
Introducing the Gardens Navigator
Each year the Horticulture Department offers several internships for college students who are pursuing careers in various aspects of horticulture. This year we had nearly 40 applications from students across the United States for our eight positions. After our interview team thoroughly grills the top applicants for several minutes, we offer them the opportunity to put us on the hot seat and ask us questions. Typical questions revolve around housing and hours....
The Importance of Being Ephemeral
The first daffodils are peeking through the soil, and some of the earliest bulbs—crocus and galanthus—are finishing up their flowering cycle.  As spring progresses we will watch the annual parade of our favorites:  tulips, allium, eremurus, and others will flower and vanish before the worst of summer heat.  Denver is a great place to grow ephemeral plants of many kinds because the harsh seasonality it experiences annually is the sort of...
Of flowers and faces: choose.
As more and more of the world is plowed under for shoppettes and housing developments, mining and farming on marginal lands (places where wild flowers once grew incidentally, now gone forever) I think a botanic gardens’ focus on flowers should intensify rather than be diluted by scampering after will-o-the-wisp distractions. Humans humans humans: I get mightily sick of the human race sometimes (those who read Denver Botanic Gardens blogs, however,...
Peru Discovery
In mid-February a group of Denver Botanic Gardens supporters and I began an exciting journey to Peru, spending time in each of the three major climate zones – the coastal desert, mountainous Andes highlands, and the rainforest of eastern Peru.  Over the next several weeks, I will present highlights from this trip, sponsored by Denver Botanic Gardens and Reefs to Rockies Travel. We begin our adventure in Peru’s capital city, Lima. ...

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