• Newsletter icon
  • Facebook icon
  • Twitter icon
  • Pinterest icon
  • Blog icon
  • YouTube icon
  • DBG Instagram

Will the real Pampas Grass please stand up?

2 Comments
Will the real Pampas Grass please stand up?

Here you can see from closer up the silky, silvery color that true pampas grass has seemed to perfect. If you have driven parts of Texas you are sure to have admired pampas grass--a popular landscape plant in that state. I used to drive down at Thanksgiving each year, and the clumps of pampas here and there along the way were like mile posts, or sentinels that cheered the trip....

more

Vantage points in winter

0 Comments
Vantage points in winter

The same sculpture a week later in a different light looks so utterly different--it's amazing how dramatically a vista changes in a matter of minutes--from the golden light of early morning or dusk to the brash clarity of mid-day or the icy Antarctic light when it's overcast. I love the way the high Rockies play peek-a-boo from various vantage points around the garden, or the captious towers of downtown Denver. Both...

more

Mind Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Series at the Gardens

1 Comments
Mind Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Series at the Gardens

What is MBSR? When people learn that I teach Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction they often respond with an exclamation, "I could use that!"  The recognition that one could use a little help navigating through "the full catastrophe" of life was what led me to attend MBSR teacher trainings at the Center for Mindfulness. Although I had meditated for many years before learning about MBSR, I still found myself mired in the ups...

more

Fire danger and the garden

0 Comments
Fire danger and the garden

I took this picture last autumn of the magnificent aspen display that covers much of Gilpin County north of Mount Evans. All of that bright yellow aspen, and much of that forest green and the pale brown meadows as well would not be there if that county had not been burned repeatedly in recent centuries. Both the aspen (Populus tremuloides) and the commonest montane conifer, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), are...

more

Plant Select: Towards a viable landscape future

0 Comments
Plant Select: Towards a viable landscape future

Although quite widely distributed in the foothills of the Southern Rockies, I have only stumbled on Scott's clematis a few times, so I suspect it is not exactly abundant. It has been produced abundantly by Plant Select propagators this past year and you should be able to find it in local garden centers this spring. The nodding, lavender bells vary from almost gray to a dark, almost black blue in...

more

Paradoxical rose of Christmas

0 Comments
Paradoxical rose of Christmas

Here is a glorious colony growing just West of our Administration building. I took that picture last February: they do bloom for many months! A good reason to plant some in a shady spot at your house. These are growing in a half dozen gardens at DBG: do take a stroll around over the next month and see how many of these paradoxical roses you can find. A little like looking...

more

Christmas red year 'round!

0 Comments
Christmas red year 'round!

OK..it's not as red as that--I suppose any one of the dozens of forms of our native Claret Cup cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiatus) would out Christmas this one, but I couldn't resist showing this amazing watermelon red hybrid cactus I stumbled on in Dryland Mesa...not literally--I happened on it. It would not be good to stumble on this... This scorching red Cardinal Flower has grown in the bog alongside the pool in...

more

Mad about Monocots!

0 Comments
Mad about Monocots!

The variability in the genus Kniphofia is truly astonishing. This massive species (Kniphofia Northiae) has been growing in the Rock Alpine Garden for nearly 20 years. It is one of the largest in the genus, and one of the first to bloom as well. I shall never forget finding a vast slope of these on Bastard Voetpad Pass in the East Cape in January of 1994, stark black stems from...

more

It's beginning to look a lot like...Springtime?

0 Comments
It's beginning to look a lot like...Springtime?

You might think that Denver Botanic Gardens is hunkered down for the winter and the only sparkle to be had comes from our nighttime electrical endeavors.  But you’d be wrong. Many plants are flowering at this time of year, and while they’ll never match the springtime display of floral abundance their delicate blossoms are made all the more magical by being present in the deep of winter.  Hailing from less severe...

more

African dreaming...

0 Comments
African dreaming...

Here is a pretty amazing patch of an ice plant from the highest mountains of the East Cape Drakensberg--which is likely to prove very hardy in mountain gardens as well. David Salman of High Country Gardens gave this to me as a host gift a few years ago: it has astonished me with the immense flowers (nearly 3" across) and its long season of bloom in the winter months: it even...

more

Pages