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Member for
1 year 3 months

Blog Posts

Featured Garden of the Week: Aquatic Gardens

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Featured Garden of the Week: Aquatic Gardens

The water gardens at Denver Botanic Gardens, despite their slow start this spring on account of hail and cooler weather could not be more spectacular than it is right now. Artistically choreographed by Joe Tomocik, Curator of Aquatic Collections, our aquatic displays are one of the best in the country. Assisting Joe every year with installation and dismantling of the displays are volunteers from the Colorado Water Garden Society. In the...

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Featured Garden of the Week: Jurassic Gardens

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Featured Garden of the Week: Jurassic Gardens

Though not located in a single location, complementing our 2009 signature exhibition, Jurassic Gardens, plantings are distributed throughout the Gardens. This exhibition features life-sized dinosaurs that roamed our planet during a time span of 280 to 65 million years ago. During this time, before the explosion of angiosperms (flowering plants), the landscape was dominated by bryophytes (mosses), pteridophytes (ferns) and gymnosperms (conifers, ginkgo, cycads, etc.). Throughout the Gardens, on display...

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Featured Garden of the Week: Cactus & Succulent House

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Featured Garden of the Week: Cactus & Succulent House

Located at the west corner of the Rock Alpine Garden, the Cactus & Succulent House at one time served as an Alpine House. The challenges of maintaining appropriate environmental conditions for alpine plants led to the conversion of this indoor display house as an exhibit for our non-hardy cacti and succulents in 2004. Consisting of over 1,200 taxa, our cactus and succulent collection, which includes hardy, marginal and non-hardy species,...

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Featured Garden of the Week: Western Panoramas

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Featured Garden of the Week: Western Panoramas

As you enter the Gardens, creating a sense of place are the three landscapes bordering the three sides of the Amphitheatre. Exhibiting dominant tree species of Colorado’s three major life zones; the plains, foothills and subalpine are the Cottonwood, Ponderosa and Bristlecone Borders respectively, collectively known as Western Panoramas.  Planted along with the trees are the dominant forbs (herbaceous flowering plants) and grasses commonly found in these life zones. These...

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